Millionaires' Row 
Location: Delaware Avenue between North & Bryant Streets
Dates: 1880s - 1920s
Architecture: French Baroque, Tudor Revival, Mediterranean Revival, Beaux Art Classical, etc
District: Delaware Avenue National Historic District
Important Notes: Many of the original yards for the mansions on the west side of Delaware reached all the way to current day Richmond Avenue

In the late 1800s, Buffalo had more millionaires per capita than any other city in America. The stretch of Delaware Avenue between North and Bryant Streets was once the richest few blocks in the entire country, and all the titans of Buffalo built their mansions along this stretch as they moved north outside of the congested Buffalo city center. Many of the current mansions remaining were built between 1890 and 1920 and heavily influenced in Renaissance Revival and Gothic Revival style architecture. Many of the mansions on the west side of the Avenue are also prominent buildings in Buffalos preservation district and key pieces in the Delaware Avenue National Historic District.

The Grace Millard Knox Mansion at 800 Delaware. Built by Charles Pierrepont H. Gilbert, a famous NYC architect who was responsible for over a dozen 5th Avenue mansions during the turn of the century. The original property stretched many city blocks, including reaching as far west to Richmond Avenue. One of the largest examples on Millionaires Row, this mansion cost nearly $600K to be built between 1915-1918 and held over 30 rooms. At the time, this French Baroque style mansion was the most expensive private residence construction project in Buffalo. 

The Clement Mansion located at 786 Delaware and perhaps one of the grandest examples along Millionaires Row. Built for an astonishing $300K in 1914 by architects Green & Wicks. This mansion was a popular gathering spot for Buffalo elitists during the early 1900s. This gray sandstone Tudor Revival mansion is English medieval influenced and boasted some unique features for its original owners, Carolyn and Stephen Clement, such as a 1.5 story music room with an elegant organ, and diamond shaped marble patterns through many of the floors inside.

The Clement Mansion located at 786 Delaware and perhaps one of the grandest examples along Millionaires Row. Built for an astonishing $300K in 1914 by architects Green & Wicks. This mansion was a popular gathering spot for Buffalo elitists during the early 1900s. This gray sandstone Tudor Revival mansion is English medieval influenced and boasted some unique features for its original owners, Carolyn and Stephen Clement, such as a 1.5 story music room with an elegant organ, and diamond shaped marble patterns through many of the floors inside.

The Williams-Pratt Mansion located at 690 Delaware Avenue. Built by Stanford White, this Neo Classical mansion was completed in 1896. Built for Charles Williams, younger brother of George Williams, who lived next door at 672 Delaware. Charles Williams was on the board of three banks in the Buffalo and owned massive amounts of real estate in Buffalo and surrounding area. Today, the Liro Group owns and operates their offices from this building.

The Williams-Pratt Mansion located at 690 Delaware Avenue. Built by Stanford White, this Neo Classical mansion was completed in 1896. Built for Charles Williams, younger brother of George Williams, who lived next door at 672 Delaware. Charles Williams was on the board of three banks in the Buffalo and owned massive amounts of real estate in Buffalo and surrounding area. Today, the Liro Group owns and operates their offices from this building.

The Williams - Butler Mansion at 672 Delaware Avenue. Finished in 1899, its over 16,000 square feet in size with and has an additional 8,000 square foot carriage house. Owned by George Williams, whose brother lived next door at 690 Delaware. The lead architect was Stanford White, who was an associate architect to H.H. Richardson on the Buffalo State Psych Hospital in 1870.  Currently used as the UB Jacobs Executive Development Center. 

841 Delaware Avenue.

The W.W. Sloan Mansion at 869 Delaware Avenue. One of architect H.H. Littles largest surviving house designs remaining in Buffalo, this mansion was built in 1892. The mansion was originally designed for William W. Sloan, treasurer of the Buffalo GE Company  and owner of a malt company at 698 Carroll Street.

The Orin Foster Mansion at 891 Delaware Avenue. Built in 1904 by architect Frank Chappelle, this Mediterranean Revival mansion was built for Orin Foster who was the co-founder of the Foster-Milburn Company, a manufacturer of patent medicines. Including the carriage houses, the total square footage of this complex is over 19,000.

The Charles W. Goodyear Mansion located at 888 Delaware Avenue. Built in 1903 at a cost of $225K by architects Green & Wicks, this mansion is an excellent example of French Renaissance style. Charles Goodyear was originally a prominent attorney with his own firm, and for four years practiced with Grover Cleveland before his Presidency. Shortly after, Goodyear joined in politics and eventually became Assistant District Attorney. He later joined his brother in the lumber industry, which provided immense wealth in the ladder years of his career. Today, the mansion is home to Oracle Charter School, however HHL Architects and Priam Development has proposed to convert the mansion into a boutique hotel and spa resort.

The Richmond-Lockwood Mansion located at 844 Delaware Avenue. This English Tudor Revival example was completed in 1888 by Marling and Burdett which originally stretched all the way west to Richmond Avenue. Today it is currently owned and occupied by Child Family Services.

The George Brewster Mathews Mansion located at 830 Delaware and designed by architects Green & Wicks in 1901. Although one of the smaller mansions in the Row, this 16 room mansion boasted a number of interior masterpieces, including an exotic green marble fireplace, grand oak bookcases throughout, and state of the art lighting fixtures to illuminate their art collections throughout the house.

Temple Beth Zion located at 805 Delaware Avenue. Built in 1967 by architect Max Abramovitz with a Brutalist inspired design. Temple Beth Zion quickly became one of Buffalo's prominent landmarks. The 1,000 seat sanctuary consists of scalloped walls, 60 foot ceilings and two 30 foot high commandment tablets which, along with two magnificent stained glass windows created by artist Ben Shahn. Check out my separate post dedicated to Brutalism architecture - https://buffalophotoblog.com/brutalism

The Forman-Cabana Mansion located at 824 Delaware (also the lead image). Completed in 1893 by architects Green & Wicks (E.B. Green as the principal designer). This mansion is a beautiful example of Beaux Art Classical design with its yellow Roman brick and stone details.

742 Delaware Avenue, current home to United Way of Buffalo.

Westminster Presbyterian Church located at 724 Delaware Avenue. Built in 1859 by architect Harlow M. Wilcox, this Romanesque Revival church is one of the oldest in the city and played an important part to Millionaires Row early on. Many of the mansion owners nearby attended this church and financially contributed to it throughout their tenure in the area. Check out my separate post here - https://buffalophotoblog.com/sunday-service-westminster-presbyterian

The Asa Silverthorne Mansion located at 877 Delaware Avenue. Plans were drawn up in 1906 by architects Esenwein and Johnson for this structure, completed just a year later. This 8,600 square foot, two and a half story mansion boasted 8 bedrooms, 8 bathrooms and 7 fireplaces. Asa Silverthorne was in the lumber industry, starting as a laborer in his uncles company and worked his way up to own his own business in Buffalo. The mansion was purchased privately in 2007 and is being restored for private use.

The Harlow C. Curtiss Mansion at 864 Delaware Avenue. Built in 1898 by architects Esenwein and Johnson, this Georgian Revival example was built for Harlow Curtiss, a top Buffalo attorney for over 40 years. Today the complex is owned and operated by the International Institute. 

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